Maoyu Maou Yuusha Series Review: Understanding the Economics of War

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Maoyu Maou Yuusha Overview:

In Maoyu Maou Yuusha, fifteen years have passed since the war between humans and demons began. The hero seeks to end the conflict by killing the demon king but discovers its a hot girl who actually wants to make peace and help both demons and humans thrive economically. It is an interesting set up as the two form an alliance to stop the war and change the world, hindered by those who are quite content with the status quo.

Maoyu Maou Yuusha Review:

Maoyu is a strange little anime that kind of came out, got a little bit of attention and then disappeared from sight. I’d like to pull it back out from under the bed, dust it off, and remind people that this gem exists. Certainly it isn’t going to make any of the big anime titles tremble in fear because the audience for this is going to remain fairly small, but I have a deep respect for an anime that sets out to achieve a goal and succeeds admirably even if the story here is decidedly unfinished and there’s a number of obvious fan-service choices cluttering up some of the screen time.



It is actually easier to describe Maoyu by talking about what it isn’t. It isn’t a good vs evil fantasy fight between a demon king and a hero. It isn’t really focused on action at all despite the war setting. It also isn’t an actual introduction to Economics though I’ve seen it described as such. Certainly war and good and evil and Economics all come into play in this story, but while you might gain an appreciation for why war and Economics are intrinsically linked, you aren’t going to walk out the other side of this anime able to have a conversation on Economic theory.

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Maoyu, for me, felt like a critique of war stories and how these stories all end with the heroes overthrowing the villains and then declaring peace and happiness when the end result of most wars is anything but even for the victor. It also felt like a critique of the real world and the way we continue to ignore real issues due to convenience and comfort. With these two ideas forming the base of the narrative, the story that unfolds is fairly average but the message it constructs is on point.

So what is a demon king (or queen) to do when the hero has come to kill them? Lay down their life? Fight to the death? Recruit the hero into a campaign of economic reform so that neither side needs the war to continue to ensure prosperity? Let’s take option three for a change and see what happens.

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None of the characters in Maoyu are given a name. Each are referred to by their job or role. This makes it much easier to generalise the ideas of this story beyond the narrative itself and see these characters as placeholders for people/nations/ideas that we are familiar with in other narratives and in real life. It is a bit awkward at times and discussing the anime by talking about the ‘female knight’ or the ‘senior maid’ might seem a bit odd to someone who hasn’t watched it, but it actually works quite well within the context of the story.

However, it isn’t all smooth sailing. Of course they want to paint a romance into the story that sometimes just feels very contrived and convenient. There are also far too many complications introduced. While on the one hand this makes the setting more true to life with multiple factions both supporting and rejecting reforms, on the other it makes it impossible to bring to any kind of satisfactory resolution to the overall narrative within the anime.

Basically, it bites off more than it can chew in its run time and ends up leaving the audience hanging, which would normally be an automatic shelve the disc and never watch again point for me, but somehow this anime managed to make me not care so much about where it was going and more about the journey to get there. Still, a season two would probably help and it is also probably never going to happen.

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The other point I will make is there is a lot of times where the characters will sit or stand and discuss farming or trade or politics. And I mean, a lot of times. So if characters sitting and discussing things isn’t what you are looking for, then this anime will end up being a firm pass. However, if you don’t mind that as long as you are interested in the topic being discussed, this won’t be an issue.

I really enjoyed this series for what it was and it just felt a little bit different. While I know it has a lot of similarities to Spice and Wolf, I found this one a little more engaging and liked the characters a bit more (sorry fans of Spice and Wolf). I’d have loved for this anime to get a second season but that seems very unlikely so I’ll just have to rewatch the DVD again and enjoy this odd little story.

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I’d love to know your thoughts on Maoyu if you’ve seen it. If you haven’t, do you think you would watch an anime like this or does it sound like something you will firmly pass on?


Thank-you for reading 100 Word Anime.
Join the discussion in the comments.
Karandi James


The Devil is a Part Timer Series Review

Devil Review

I’d be the first to admit, I’m not the biggest fan of comedy and I over-the-top and absurd scenarios usually don’t sit well with me. However ‘The Devil is a Part Timer’, the story of Satan (or Sadao Mao) learning about the modern world and beginning his new conquest from a one room apartment while serving fries absolutely hit the spot for me and is a comedy I’ll absolutely admit I like because I find it funny and not in-spite of the jokes.

The Devil is a Part Timer - Review
The colourful cast also help.

The comedy in this show is fantastic (at least for my tastes) as it balances absurd humour and satire fairly well throughout most of the series while still managing the odd moment of touching friendship and drama. While the occasional boob joke may intrude, for the most part the show relies on situational comedy and it plays the fish out of water card with precision and for merciless laughs.

The Devil is a Part Timer hits the right mark with its comedy more often than not.

Highlights include Satan’s dilemma over whether to use his power to cook chips when the fryer breaks. This is a moment stretched out for dramatic tension. He stands poised but frozen in indecision. He doesn’t have much power. But they won’t be first in sales if they can’t sell the chips. What should he do? And then the moment is broken and we see him hanging his head in utter defeat.



Mao’s character is perhaps where this series succeeds. Mao is an incredibly powerful character who is defeated in episode one. His power is stripped away for most of the series allowing us to believe that this all powerful devil is in fact willing to play nice in the corporate structure of the McRonalds and actually does have to agonise over choices.

However, because it is a comedy, through the power of plot convenience (and some quick explanations about possible ways to recharge his power) Mao returns to being an absolutely unstoppable bad-ass just often enough to deliver some pretty impressive fight sequences and even makes his usual arrogance and gloating tone feel less obnoxious and more just a statement of fact.

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He may be down for now, but don’t count him out. He’s got ambitions.

For an anime full of demonic characters, to be honest the demons really do demonstrate a lot of great character traits and while they try and maintain a cold exterior, these goofballs and just hilarious to watch and spend time with. Their grand plans and ambitions that travel practically nowhere are always entertaining and kind of inspiring even if they don’t actually succeed.

Of course, the demonic characters end up being a lot more humane than the angelic ones in this story which has some interesting implications about the nature of good and evil should you choose to actually not just switch your brain off and laugh at the mesmerised crocodiles during one particularly ridiculous scenario.

Also, Emilia’s dissatisfaction with her own mundane life and her inability to accept her changing relationship with Satan is regularly played for laughs even while it addresses real issues about not judging books by their covers and learning to move on. That and to stop projecting onto other people. The anime doesn’t really dwell on morals and messages but there’s enough going on here that it doesn’t feel empty and each character provides a lesson of sorts.

Lucifer’s portrayal as an introvert and lay about also brings on some good laughs later in the series. As does his plaintive complaints about his treatment (given he did try to kill most of the other cast members).

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In addition to comedy the show offers some good satirical commentary about the nature of the modern world and whether or not our current work/corporate culture is evil. This point is further emphasised in the final episode that moves entirely away from the clash between angels and demons and focuses entirely on sales scams.

While some of the characters remain one dimensional and the basic premise never really evolves beyond Lord Satan is working part time and somehow believes he will one day rule the world, this series is more than entertaining enough. The few complaints about the odd missed joke and the sleazy portrayal of Sariel seem petty when looking at the overall.

The music is neither good nor bad (it fulfils its purpose but is readily forgotten after the fact) and the animation is neither particularly good or bad, though the character designs do their job and some of Satan’s poses during the final fight with Sariel are pretty hilarious.

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That said, I have to nominate Ashiya/Alciel for being the single most useless minion of all time. Like I get he’s incredibly loyal to Satan but he really managed to miss or be completely incapacity for every significant plot point in this anime (which is in fact the joke).


Thank-you for reading 100 Word Anime.
Join the discussion in the comments.
Karandi James