Tokyo 24-ku Episode 7: Time Moves on But The Plot Seems To Be On Hold

Tokyo 24-Ku Episode 7

Tokyo 24-ku seems like it was running low on steam this week. Either that or it is a lull before a storm however when the characters are all dispersed the way episode 6 left them, a lot of the charm of this anime seems to be missing in action. Maybe it is a case where if I was able to binge watch and move straight to the next episode it wouldn’t be so obvious but really all I got out of this episode was that Shuta is pretty useless on his own (and we already knew that) and bread is apparently awesome.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 7

Not that Shuta is actually on his own. None of the characters in Tokyo 24-ku are. Shuta has Mari and his mother to support him as well as his father returning at the end of the episode. Kouki has a whole organisation around him. Even Ran has a group on the run with him. The problem is, other than Mari, none of these supporting cast members have really done much to feel like more than background noise.

Tokyo 24-Ku felt a little underwhelming this week.

For an anime that has given us one trolley dilemma after another and life or death stakes every other week, an episode that just looks at the reality of growing up felt very flat. Yes, childhood friends grow apart. They connect with others and their goals move them down different paths and eventually they may no longer connect even if they want to.



And as much as Shuta seems to think there is, there’s no magic moment when you stop feeling like a kid and realise you are an adult. You just kind of keep going and one day you look back and wonder how it is you got where you ended up. Maybe that’s a really cynical way of looking at it but really Shuta seems to be agonising over his own lack of progress but he’s working in the bakery and improving his skills and still helping people out. Seems like he’s doing what he actually wanted to do.

His dream of being a hero isn’t so much squashed as taking a new form and finding ways to help people within his actual means.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 7

Of course, I probably have another reason to feel down about this episode of Tokyo 24-Ku. For whatever reason they felt the need to nearly drown Shuta is the public bath after he took a bath while exhausted. I’ve mentioned before on this blog I have issues with drowning and here it felt like such a pointless scene. Not to mention both of the characters who went to perform CPR did so terribly.

First we get Kinako, Ran’s friend who has been left behind now that he’s on the run, who went for the usual cliche kiss approach to CPR and didn’t even try to hold his nose or literally anything that would actually make it effective. Fortunately she dithered so long Shuta’s father turns up. However he just goes for some super glowy mystical chest slam forcing the water out of Shuta’s lungs (though in reality probably cracking a rib in the process) and Shuta coughs himself awake. As usual, no ongoing effects from nearly drowning.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 7

Honestly, I shouldn’t be annoyed at an anime for not accurately representing reality particularly in a show where magical phone calls increase abilities and give visions of the future. It isn’t like Tokyo 24-ku has tried to be particularly grounded. Still, poorly demonstrated CPR bothers me.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 7

Anyway, the one actual plot point we get from this episode of Tokyo 24-ku is that the new phone alert system is spreading through the ward and arrests are up. Whether that ends up being a good thing or the next step toward the loss of freedom remains to be seen.

Images from: Tokyo 24-ku. Dir N Tsuda. Cloverworks. 2022


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Karandi James


Tokyo 24-ku Episode 6: There’s Always A Girl In A Tube

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 6 Review

Why is it that in these super-sophisticated futuristic computers somehow it always comes down to a girl floating in a tube? Okay, sometimes the glass liquid filled tube isn’t powering a computer but we’ve seen this enough to have known exactly what was coming in the slow reveal of the mystery behind the computer system in Tokyo 24-ku as it embraces the cliché.

I think the most startling thing about that reveal was that Koki took so long to figure it out. That, and wondering why the tube was initially covered by blue scales which kind of magically disappeared to reveal the girl. It all seemed like there were a lot of unnecessary moving parts in this sequence. And no one in the audience was surprised to find that the deceased Asumi is at the centre of given she’s been making phone calls to the boys all season.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 6

Tokyo 24-ku stepped its story up this week.

While the previous episodes of Tokyo 24-ku seemed to be settling into a rhythm of give boys a problem, deal with problem, then spend time dealing with the fallout, all with the ongoing mystery of the various political and corporate shenanigans in the background, episode 6 deals with the fallout of last week’s terrorist attack but shift the attention firmly onto the governor of the ward and his personal mission.



Between the terrorist’s released video and the governor himself, this episode is full of lines examining safety, privacy and freedom as the people in the ward are faced with the decision of whether to install the latest version of hazard cast onto their already quite invasive phones. If it wasn’t quite so ham-fisted, it would be an excellent opportunity to talk about internet privacy and freedom of speech though to be honest Tokyo 24-ku is nowhere near sophisticated enough to really get into the nuance of the issue and is rather just hoping that by at least referencing a topical debate they can gain additional emotional buy-in from the audience.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 6

And they are right in that it works. The story unfolding in Tokyo 24-ku definitely makes you think of all those news headlines and current debates in parliaments over social media and other online issues. Not to mention it goes even further and directly has the governor declare one of the terrorists claims to be ‘fake news’. If you hadn’t already connected with topical issues and concerns there’s no way that phrase didn’t.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 6

But where things get a little more interesting in Tokyo 24-ku is in the way the three boys at the centre have definitely fallen out and gone their own ways. Even Shuta notes that while Koki is working for SARG and Ran is with DoRed (now targeted by SARG because of the terrorist incident), he really doesn’t have any standing in the game anymore as the son of a baker with no job or real connections to anything.

This was something that became fairly clear in episode 5 as the other two acted with purpose and Shuta kind of bounced around the cruise ship and ultimately accomplished nothing.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 6

For the other two, you might hope that friendship would win out but through Ran we see flashbacks to their childhood and Ran also directly states that he knows Koki will not stand with him. It doesn’t appear like Ran is particularly surprised or upset by this, which makes you realise that Ran and Koki were connected to Shuta and the three were only really held together by Asumi and Mari. Such fragile bonds were bound to break.

There’s still a chance the two will find a common ground to come together again but at the end of episode 6 it seems they’ve both made their choices. And as the childhood connection between RGB breaks, so does the school building start getting demolished. Yeah, the symbolism isn’t subtle but again it works.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 6

We’re at the half-way mark of Tokyo 24-ku and quite clearly this episode marked a turning point. That kind of leaves me a little unsure about how the story will proceed from here but I do know I want to know where it is going and whether they can bring all the parts together.

Images from: Tokyo 24-ku. Dir N Tsuda. Cloverworks. 2022


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Tokyo 24-ku Episode 5: No Room For Compromise

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 5 Review

Tokyo 24-ku might risk starting to feel repetitive if the boys receive missions that are all just slight variations on the trolley dilemma and yet we see in this fifth episode that there’s still some room for them to explore. While the first dilemma they faced was easily overcome by finding a third option, the second problem that floated their way ended in failure due to a lack of communication (and the scale of the disaster they were up against).

In this fifth episode we see again the boys having been posed a variation on this question. The options given to have a terrorist shot dead or have a boat full of people blown up. Even learning that the boat is full of the wealthy and probably corrupt who are the cause of numerous problems in the district doesn’t really make blowing up the boat seem like an actually viable solution and Kouki, the most rational of the team, more or less draws a line on this one. He’s going to use Sarg to take down the terrorist and that isn’t up for debate.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 5

Tokyo 24-ku divides its lead characters this episode, both physically and morally.

Where Shuta boards the boat, ambitiously hoping to find the explosives themselves and neutralise them, his role this episode is considerably diminished as the main drama focuses on Ran and his allegiances as well as Kouki’s determination and black and white view of the world.



Sure, Shuta gets a brief action sequence where he gets to hop about and avoid gunfire but ultimately he doesn’t manage to retrieve the explosives or have much impact on anything and is actually so in the dark about everything else that has transpired he doesn’t even know why after the events are resolved he cannot contact either Ran or Kouki.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 5

This really is Ran’s episode though with Kouki merely providing the contrasting perspective this week in Tokyo 24-ku. Unlike the other two, Ran recognised the terrorist in the vision and through a series of flashbacks we learn about Ran’s childhood and growing up as well as the formation of DoRed with his partner in crime (or I guess partner in art would be more appropriate).

But, disillusioned by his lack of artistic talent compared to Ran, he delved into hacking, at least until Ran surpassed him there as well. Still, he developed an App that if used correctly could have been an amazing thing for so many people and yet, as Ran had cautioned while his friend was developing it, if used incorrectly things could go badly wrong.

And so the mystery behind the mind-altering drug in the slums is finally revealed.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 5

Where the audience of Tokyo 24-ku can really get drawn into this episode is in seeing the sequence of steps, mostly innocent ones, that ended up leading a character to such a dark place. A simple feeling of inadequacy as well as being broke and having little power or ability to protect his family, an app developed with the optimistic goal of making people’s lives better and selling it in order to reap immediate rewards, and then the ugly spiral downward after realising just what had resulted from actions that were never intended to harm.

Even though he is ultimately painted very clearly as a terrorist and his actions are clearly no longer driven by that optimism or hope to change the world for the better, you can’t help but wonder how things might have been different if the world hadn’t failed this character so completely.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 5

Though ultimately what this episode of Tokyo 24-ku leaves me wondering the most is how will Ran choose to deal with this. In the moment he very nearly made an irrevocable and incredibly poor choice but was stopped, weirdly by the guy who had been about to make the same choice.

Will Ran be able to work with Kouki or Shuta again? Or is this the catalyst that takes Ran from being someone who wants to change people through art to someone who wants to take more drastic actions and will this see him at odds with the other two?

As I said at the start of this post, Tokyo 24-ku could fall into too familiar patterns if it just set up a trolley dilemma and had the boys resolve it but so far each incident has highlighted different aspects of the political and social situation within the ward as well as the personalities of the boys themselves. I am curious to see where this will go.

Images from: Tokyo 24-ku. Dir N Tsuda. Cloverworks. 2022


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Tokyo 24-ku Episode 4: A Funeral, Some Graffiti and a Potential Terrorist Plot

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 4 Review

Tokyo 24-ku seems to be going for a pattern of having an episode full of action as the boys attempt to prevent some disaster followed by an episode of contemplation, decision making and a few titbits of conspiracy thrown in for good measure. Though I’m not entirely sure why I keep thinking of the main characters as ‘boys’ when they are all graduated from high-school but potentially it is because the overall tone here feels like they could be middle-schoolers at times.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 4

Actually, as much as I have enjoyed what Tokyo 24-ku has delivered so far, I must admit the three boys at the heart of it, RBG themselves, feel kind of out of place for the underlying issues and larger scale political manoeuvring that seem to be going on. Even with Kouki’s connection to law enforcement through his internship as well as his father’s position giving him access to information he should have, it really doesn’t help the group feel like they have a place in the events actually going on and yet there they are in the centre of everything.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 4

I wonder if that will fade as the story goes on or whether this is just the result of some adolescent wish fulfilment where of course the problems must be solved by the innovative younger generation and people in older established positions must either be irrelevant, useless, or actually the cause of the problem.

Tokyo 24-ku continues to be interesting but isn’t really able to carry some of the dramatic themes it seems to be introducing.

For episode 4 of Tokyo 24-ku we dive right into the funeral of the teacher, Kaba who died in the botched attempt at rescuing people from the tornado, and see the characters once again mourning the loss of someone they cared for as well as understanding their own sense of failure. Kouki and Ran aren’t taking it quite as hard as Shuuta but that is because they are each continuing to fight injustices in their own ways day to day.



Ran continues his street art campaign and even begins a series devoted to Kaba to remember his life even if only briefly before someone paints over his work. Kouki has thrown himself into the investigation as an intern and has buried himself under paperwork. It is only really Shuuta who as no real direction as helping his parents in the bakery is nice and all but doesn’t give his inner desire to be a hero an outlet, and like with the disaster that killed Asumi, Shuuta’s confidence has taken a major hit with the death of his former teacher.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 4

However I was wrong in my prediction last week when I suggested that Kozue wouldn’t leave her house again after the tragedy. Instead she instigates most of the second act when Shuuta spies her walking around alone at night and follows her only to lose her in shanty-town. During the course of his search for her he gets caught up in a drug bust that Kouki is a part of and then runs into Ran who uses his network to locate her. Turns out, despite all the half-hints that maybe she’s into drugs or something shady, Kozue is actually just looking for the art that is appearing around town remembering Kaba.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 4

While the boys of Tokyo 24-ku are involved in this there’s also some background noise. We know the drug D is spreading and causing violent incidents and there’s also the mysterious hacking incident that took place after the tornado. Throw in the desire of some of the higher ups to ‘redevelop’ the 24th ward including the building of a casino, and there’s more than enough intrigue going on.

After a relatively quiet and reflecting episode, Tokyo 24-ku does give the boys another phone call from Asumi only this time the message is very personal for Ran. The choice, take out a terrorist before he denotates a bomb or let a boat full of wealthy people die. Only, unlike the last two questions, this one seems like it isn’t as time pressed and it also seems like there are plenty of other options. I guess we’ll have to see how it plays out in episode 5.

Images from: Tokyo 24-ku. Dir N Tsuda. Cloverworks. 2022


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Tokyo 24-ku Episode 3: Small Crisis To Major Disaster in Twenty Minutes

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 3 Review

Tokyo 24-ku does a good job in episode 3 of lulling you into thinking we’re going to focus entirely on the cooking competition and that the danger is going to come from standing up to the developers. And certainly the early stages of the episode that is exactly what the anime focuses on as the boys and Marin find out that all the cabbages have been purchased prior to the competition leaving them short of a critical ingredient.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 3

The cabbage crisis however is a bit of a red-herring and fairly easily resolved when their former teacher comes to the rescue having secured supplies for them. However that is also a bit of a misleading moment because then I was waiting for some other problem to develop or for the yakuza-like thugs of the opposition to prevent the stand from operating. Mostly though things are peaceful largely because the owner of the competition is convinced he’s already won.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 3

Tokyo 24-ku fills this episode with potential threats that don’t quite develop, until a really big disaster emerges.

There’s one thing I have been wondering through episode 1 and episode 2 of Tokyo 24-ku that really has nothing to do with the plot or general enjoyment. It is more I’m wondering why the three boys are referred to as RGB when RBG seems easier to say to me. Maybe I’m nit-picking but RGB doesn’t sit comfortably with me and every time I hear it in the anime or read it in the subs my brain tries to rearrange it into the more comfortable acronym. Okay, I’ll just accept I’m fixating on something utterly unimportant and get back to reviewing this episode.



Anyway, while most of the characters are enjoying selling the food or eating, there is a parallel story with the teacher’s daughter, who is more or less shut in her room and still traumatised from the death of her friend in the fire. See he asked her to come to the food festival and after going through the social media of her friends’ there decides to venture outside.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 3

And now Tokyo 24-ku really has set the stage for the disaster. During the judging the teacher reveals the cheap ploy being used by one group to win the competition more or less assuring that Marin will be victorious but then the boy’s receive a call. Yes, one of those calls. And unlike the first mission they were given this one is going to cost multiple lives regardless of the outcome they choose with a tornado about to bear down on the festival.

I’m going to admit, I wasn’t expecting natural disasters to be thrown their way. Man-made concerns like speeding trains are one thing and there are options but the only real option with a tornado is to get out of its way and they really haven’t been given enough time.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 3

Now Tokyo 24-ku more or less has you where it wants you. Part of your brain is thinking the boys will pull off some super insane rescue and manage to evacuate or protect everyone, much as they managed to save Marin and the train in the first double episode.

However, the other part of you looks at the situation and realises that there is no chance of evacuating that whole area and nowhere near enough shelter.

Throw in some poor communication between the boys themselves and while they certainly saved some people this was not a flawless victory.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 3

Oh yeah, the girl who was coming to the festival, leaving her house really for the first time since the fire tragedy… Well I don’t think she’s leaving her house again after this effort.

Anyway, Tokyo 24-ku remains solidly watchable with enough decent moments of tension and character work even if for the most part it isn’t quite hitting the solid emotional notes it feels like should be. In episode 3, while the interesting scene transitions remain, the visuals feel like they’ve become a lot more conventional and less interesting and the rescue sequence toward the end has nowhere near the visual excitement of the train rescue. It isn’t bad but its definitely not blowing the viewers away.

Images from: Tokyo 24-ku. Dir N Tsuda. Cloverworks. 2022


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Tokyo 24-ku Episode 2: Out With The Old / Never Let Go

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 2 Review

Rather than ploughing forward with a new mission or rescue, Tokyo 24-ku instead takes episode two to really deal with the fall out from the train track rescue as well as to give some more clarity around the events leading up to the tragic fire that took Asumi’s life. It is an interesting choice and it is one that shifts the focus from the action to the characters but even more toward the world building behind them.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

I do find it interesting how many anime deal with the idea of a street mall or some other traditional venue being put at risk by new developments. It is one that comes up again and again and I guess in a country that is as populated as Japan and with limited land for development it is a conflict that would continue to come up. Do you leave the old street mall in place or is the shiny shopping complex now enough? Is the first primary school built on the island worth saving or should it be removed to make way for something new?

While the present day characters in Tokyo 24-ku are facing a real threat to their mall both in lack of customers as well as pressure to win an upcoming competition we learn that the kids were facing a conflict of their own prior to the fire that changed their lives. When they learned their primary school building was to be torn down they turned it into a community art project in a bid to save it and seemingly were getting quite a lot of public attention. And then someone burned it down causing the tragedy that split the central trio apart and still looms over all the characters in the present.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

Tokyo 24-ku is slowing building up a picture of the world these characters are in and it is really helping to ground them.

All of these very real world conflicts might seem at odds with a story that opened in episode one with characters that gained seeming super-powers after receiving a mysterious phone call, but that first episode did establish enough of the world that this conflict feels like a natural progression. More than that, it makes it clear that the solution to the problems facing these characters isn’t going to be a simple one.



So when all is said and done, this was a strong follow up episode for Tokyo 24-ku and I think for me it did what I needed it to do and that was to make me believe in the world these characters lived in. With that relatively established now I’ll probably happily suspend disbelief unless the story goes right off the rails in the future.

However, this episode also showed one of the problems Tokyo 24-ku is probably going to carry with it all the way through. With three members of RBG to catch up with and learn about their past experiences and their current circumstances as well as Mari who acts as the go-between and holds most of this episode together and the story ends up being told in pieces as we cut from one to the other. Not helped by the inclusion of a scene that is clearly establishing a potential future antagonist as well as building up the conspiracy by having the teacher meet with a member of SARG.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

It means no one character gets really enough time on screen in a twenty-four minute episode. Mari is about the only one who really gets sufficient screen time but for the majority of the episode she acts more as a catalyst rather than a character. Which made the scene where she did break down and cry after remembering the tragedy that took Asumi’s life fairly memorable because for so much of the episode Mari is just the happy girl who tries to pick everyone else’s spirits up.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

All and all, there’s a lot to like here though that isn’t to say that Tokyo 24-ku isn’t biting off more than it can chew. This week didn’t touch at all on the idea of the surveillance people are under and it may find soon it has too many ideas running around. Then again, maybe it knows exactly what it is doing and will bring them all together. I’m keen to find ot.

Images from: Tokyo 24-ku. Dir N Tsuda. Cloverworks. 2022


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Is Tokyo 24-ku Worth Watching?

Tokyo 24-ku worth watching?

An original anime from Clover Works coming out this season with a potential sci-fi tag? Okay, I’m at least giving Tokyo 24-ku a first look because that seems like a good mix of ingredients for something that will at least be intriguing even if it doesn’t end up quite sticking the landing. That said, I went in largely blind and hadn’t watched any promotional videos for this anime so I kind of spent most of this double episode wondering what the overall focus is going to end up being (if it has one).

Though, that said I did pause fairly early on to look up who was voicing some of the characters because there were some oddly familiar tones here and I kind of discovered all three of the main characters here have some impressive talent behind their voices.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

Of course none of that tells you what Tokyo 24-ku is actually about and that’s probably because I’m still a little confused. I mean the actual events here all make sense but the eerie opening sequence as well as a range of standard dystopian themes pop up throughout making it difficult to know where the real focus is outside of the three characters who are all trying to deal with their grief from one of the opening incidents in their own way.

Is Tokyo 24-ku worth watching?

Between the idea of constant surveillance (almost Psycho Pass style) and the idea of predicting crime with one character lamenting that criminals can’t be arrested until they’ve committed crimes (reminding me strongly of Minority Report), there’s more than enough substance to sink your teeth into. However we also have a terrorist fire bombing a school (the opening tragedy) and a potential ghost in the machine moment where the voice of a dead friend/sister calls out to the central characters through their mobile phones and sends them to avert a future tragedy (seemingly giving them super-powers in the process).

If you think that’s a lot, I’m right with you and I’m very glad Tokyo 24-ku at least didn’t try and pack all of that into twenty minutes going instead for a longer run time. There’s also the whole part where the officials sped up the development of a train so much they couldn’t even deal with the emergency that occurred because basic safety features like the ability to stop it remotely weren’t working.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

It’s a CloverWorks anime which means visually it has the potential to be great and already this first episode has declared the visual style of this anime with the three main characters each having a signature colour and seeing some very fluid movement sequences. However, I can’t say that CloverWorks has a great track record at this point as for every Bunny-Girl Senpai and Season 1 of The Promised Neverland we end up with a season 2 of the Promised Neverland or Dakaichi (which as much as I loved Dakaichi was not visually impressive or even consistent).

That said, this first episode of Tokyo 24-ku was pretty pleasing to the eye and I’m looking forward to exploring the settings and locations more.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

Where the first episode of Tokyo 24-ku really shone though was in its three main characters. While the introduction to them, outside the burning building with tempers flaring, is a little on the blunt side, after we jump the year into the future after the tragedy and see each of the boys having gone their own way with their lives coming back together is actually pretty satisfying.



While our overly athletic type, Shuuta, clearly wants to be a hero his confidence is shattered after the fire and he’s finding himself a little adrift. It isn’t such an uncommon way to set up a character but he isn’t just wallowing in self-pity as he still maintains a cheerful air as he helps his community in his own way. I kind of felt his character was really well done particularly when his confidence breaks during the final dramatic rescue in the episode.

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

However, he’s outshone by the two other characters introduced in the first episode of Tokyo 24-ku (at least in terms of making me intrigued to know more about them). Ran is a graffiti artist who is clearly at odds with the system and willing to step outside the law to achieve his ends. In his own way he is also playing hero but he works through art and hacking.

Likewise, Kouki is the more straight laced on the trio wanting to enter politics and currently interning at the organisation that is seemingly behind all the surveillance. It isn’t hard to see how these three bonded as students because even though their approaches are miles apart they all have strong convictions and aren’t afraid to act on them.

Tokyo 24-ku episode 1

I also really liked that Tokyo 24-ku didn’t just make them all super strong or fast. After the mysterious phone call they receive each finds their natural abilities heightened and in the dramatic rescue that makes up the final act of this episode all three employ their skills to support the others.

Naturally it isn’t all smooth sailing. Tokyo 24-ku clearly has divided this group after the tragedy that occurred a year ago and bringing them together won’t be as easy as a single phone call and rescue operation. Hopefully they can continue to make them interesting as they find a way to repair the relationship between them (or maybe they will all go their own ways in the end).

Tokyo 24-ku Episode 1

Tokyo 24-ku may not be the anime of the season and may fizzle quickly after this opening episode but I’m solidly in at this point. While the story itself is reminiscent of many others the characters here work well together and I’m looking forward to seeing more from the cast.

As always though I’d love to know what you think. If you watched Tokyo 24-ku be sure to leave a comment.

Images from: Tokyo 24-ku. Dir N Tsuda. Cloverworks. 2022


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Karandi James